BULBS 101: Planting in Containers

By: Shelby Baker – Communication Intern

In the last in installment of our series on Bulbs, we talked about planting bulbs in your garden. Doing this can take some work, but it can also be exciting to see what your flowers will look like the following season. If you don’t have a garden to plant bulbs in, don’t be discouraged. This week’s Bulb Blog is all about planting bulbs in containers!

Planting…..in a different manner

Okay, so you now know how to tell which type of bulb you have. You know which side is up (for those who missed the last blog, it’s the pointy/smaller end of the bulb), and you know which season to plant your bulbs in. So the next step is deciding on which container to use. If you’re planning on planting multiple bulbs for a beautiful array of flowers, use a large, deep container. Remember that the container should include holes in the bottom so water doesn’t sit, causing the bulbs to become moldy and useless.

Orange container

Colored containers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To get the most out of what little space you have in your container, stack your bulbs. Although this sounds bizarre, stacking your bulbs actually works and makes your containers look fuller while in bloom. Since you’re essentially planting bulbs on top of each other though, you will want to start further down. Keep in mind how tall your bulbs will grow. This can help you decide how far down you should start planting your bulbs. Start off by planting your larger bulbs about six to eight inches deep. Add a layer of dirt and then add another layer of bulbs, each smaller in size than the last. Continue to do this until you have reached the top of the container. When you have filled the container an inch or two to the top, add a layer of potting soil to finish filling the pot. This will help to keep the top layer of bulbs moist and hidden from the sun. Just like planting bulbs in your garden, all of the hard work is done, and you’re ready for you bulbs to bloom!

layered bulbs

Layer your bulbs largest to smallest for best results!

Make sure to consistently water your bulbs and give them adequate sunlight. If you are plating spring bulbs you might want to allow your container to sit outside during winter. The constant exposure to the lower temperatures will increase the chances of your bulbs blooming in early spring! Happy planting!

Want to know more about bulbs? Make sure to check in on the KAB blog throughout the upcoming weeks. We will be sharing more on bulbs and lead up to the unveiling of KAB’s, Bulbscape!